ADVERTISEMENT

Soil Carbon And Nutrient Dynamics Following Cessation Of Anthropogenic Disturbances In Degraded Subtropical Forests

Soil carbon (C) and nutrients are fundamental to forest biodiversity and function. Forest degradation has led to the reduction in soil C and nutrients in global forests, particularly in a tropical biome where human population density is high. Ecological restoration of degraded forests can increase soil C and nitrogen (N), but the dynamics of plant essential nutrients such as phosphorus (P), potassium (K), calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg) in soil following restoration, however, are largely unknown.

In a recent paper published in Land Degradation & Development (Feng et al. 2017), researchers from Anhui Agricultural University in China and Lakehead University in Canada studied how soil pH, bulk density, organic matter, water content, C stock and C, N, P, K, Ca, and Mg concentrations changed over time following the cessation of anthropogenic disturbances in subtropical forests in China. They also examined how the stoichiometric (mass concentration) ratios of C vs. nutrients and N vs. P respond over time following the cessation of anthropogenic disturbances.

ADVERTISEMENT

The study found that stand basal area, soil water content, organic matter content, and C concentration and stock increased, while soil pH and bulk density decreased over time, with the most pronounced effects in topsoil layer. Total and available N and K, as well as available P and total Mg, increased, but total P in the 20-30 cm layer and Ca in all soil layers decreased over time. The mass concentration ratios of soil C to total N and available N, P, and K decreased, whereas those for C to total P and Ca as well as total N to total P and available N to available P increased over time.

The findings of the study indicate that C and biologically driven nutrients increase, and geochemically driven nutrients in soil decrease, while plant biomass accumulates following restoration. This study suggests that ecological restoration through the cessation of anthropogenic disturbances in degraded mountain forests increase ecological functions and prevent soil nutrient loss.

The study,Ā Soil Carbon and Nutrient Dynamics Following Cessation of Anthropogenic Disturbances in Degraded Subtropical Forests was recently published in the journalĀ Land Degradation & Development.

ADVERTISEMENT

Comment (1)

Comments

READ THIS NEXT

What Is Behind Mars’ Stunted Growth?

Explaining why Mars is so much smaller and accreted far quicker than the Earth is a long-standing problem in planetary […]

Polar Bears Are Starving Due To Global Warming, Study Finds

One of the most immediate effects of Global Warming is its negative impact on life in the poles. Carnivores, particularly […]

Dodo Bird Meets Goldilocks: Psychotherapy And The Placebo Effect

In Alice in Wonderland (Chapter III, “A Caucus-Race and a Long Tale”), Alice viewed a race among all animals initiated […]

GPAtlasRRT: Exploring What We Cannot See

When manipulating an unfamiliar object, we use the sense of touch to feel our way around it. We feel even […]

KPI For Calculating The Climate-potential Of Passive Cooling Systems

As reported by several international research publications, in recent years, in both emerging and industrialized countries, the energy consumption for […]

The Case For Accurate Reporting Of “Nonsignificant” Results

Empirical research based on experiments and data analysis requires an objective measure of the pre-experimental difference between treatment groups. The […]

History And Myth: The Genesis Of Modern-Day Pests

From the Old World to the New, mythologies of origins typically portray the emergence of agriculture as a gift or […]

Science Trends is a popular source of science news and education around the world. We cover everything from solar power cell technology to climate change to cancer research. We help hundreds of thousands of people every month learn about the world we live in and the latest scientific breakthroughs. Want to know more?