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How To Write A Capital i In Cursive

How to write a capital “i” in cursive? Writing letters in cursive is not as hard as it may appear. If you learn how to do even just one specific letter in cursive, you will be a lot closer to mastering the rest of the alphabet. And that is certainly the case with a capital i.

The Importance of Cursive Writing

There was a time when cursive writing was considered such an important skill that it was taught in many colleges across the United States. And, although in recent years there has been a marked decline in both the importance that is attached to this skill and the number of people who master it, there is still interest in cursive writing.

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Penmanship is not quite a lost art form yet. In fact, because far fewer people master it now, it has become a somewhat sought-after skill. There are many situations where cursive writing can be a great choice: for instance, hand-written invites.

Penmanship means a lot to me. I don’t have cursive penmanship, though. I’ve created my own penmanship. It’s very clear. Everyone can read it. I write things down all day long. – Action Bronson

Interestingly, cursive writing was devised in order to facilitate faster handwriting. The key to good cursive writing is to make it seem that the writing flows. That is why most letters seem to be joined together in a cursive script. But it is important not to get carried away by that because if you join all the words together, then the script might become too hard to read. And good cursive writing is not supposed to hard to read.

Cursive writing has a long history in many cultures. Therefore, cursive is possible in different alphabets and writing systems. How to do cursive letters depends on the alphabet in which you are writing. Because English uses the Latin alphabet, we will focus on the looped style. The looped style is thus named because the letters forming the words are joined together by loops. The looped style is not only suitable for English, but also for every language that uses the Latin alphabet, including Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Italian, Dutch, etc.

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First Thing Is First  

The first thing that you need to do before attempting to write a capital “i” in cursive or any other letter is to warm up. Although warming up may seem a waste of time that will only delay the writing of the letter, it is actually time well spent.

Warming up exercises are not only necessary, but they will actually save you time because you should be able to write better if you have taken the time to warm up properly.

“Sending a handwritten letter is becoming such an anomaly. It’s disappearing. My mom is the only one who still writes me letters. And there’s something visceral about opening a letter – I see her on the page. I see her in her handwriting.” — Steve Carell

All you need to do your warm-up exercises is to get a hold of a practice sheet. You can find one easily online. Make sure that you print out as many copies as you think you would need. Generally, just one sheet should do but do not worry if that is not enough and you need to print out more sheets.

The point of practice sheets is that you can practice your strokes. It is always a good idea to begin with upward strokes and then follow with curves. Do this on, at least, a couple of lines before you attempt to make any cursive letters.

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To avoid disappointment, you need to know that mastering the art of cursive writing takes a lot of practice. If you want to become really proficient at using the cursive alphabet in your writing you must be prepared to practice. Usually for beginners, it is necessary to practice every day. When you practice you should make it gradually more challenging. Begin with simple upward and downward tracing but soon move on to actual letters. Then, try putting letters together and form words. And when you are happy with your words, begin to make up sentences. Be prepared to practice for about 20 minutes a day if you want to master this particular style of penmanship. But, do not worry if your cursive letters do not look exactly like you think they should. Once you got the basic, you should not try to imitate what you see closely but, instead, develop your very own style. One of the beauties of cursive writing is that it allows different writers to develop their own unique styles.

Capital or Lowercase I in Cursive?

Once you have done enough practicing on the sheets and feel ready to tackle actual letters, you should make your first attempt at actual cursive letters.

And although if you are reading this, you just want to make a capital “I” letter, you should always begin with lowercase letters. If you work on your lowercase “I” first you should be able to master the capital “I” a lot quicker.

The lowercase “i” is a simple letter to write. All you need to do is to trace an upward stroke starting at the bottom line and reaching the dotted line in the middle. Once you reach the dotted line, you should gently slide all the way down to the bottom line. Finally, draw a dot just above the dotted line.

You should practice the lowercase “i” as many times as possible until you are pleased with how they are coming out.

Once you have mastered the lowercase version, you should move on to the capital I. This letter only requires an upward stroke. Again, start at the bottom line of your practice sheet but, this time, go all the way to the top line.

Practice the capital I letter until you are happy with the result. Once you have learned how to do it, you should incorporate this capital letter into your daily practice routine. The good news is that mastering this letter you are a lot closer to mastering other capital letters, including B, D, J, P, and T, as they all share the same upward stroke. The main thing to remember is that you will need to practice each letter individually many times over.

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