What Does No Correlation Mean In Science?
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Daniel obtained his BS in Communications and is pursuing a Master's degree in the science of Human-Computer Interaction. He hopes to work on projects which bridge the sciences and humanities. His background in education and training is diverse including education in computer science, communication theory, psychology, and philosophy. He aims to create content that educates, persuades, entertains and inspires.

                       

What Does No Correlation Mean In Science?

Part of the job of statistical analysis is to discern possible relationships between two or more variables. Two or more variables are said to be correlated if the value of one variable changes as the other variable changes, either increasing or decreasing as the value of the other variable does so. If there is no correlation between two variables, it means that the variables do not appear to be statistically related, that the value of one variable doesn't increase or...

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Archaebacteria: Definition And Examples

Archaebacteria are similar in form to bacteria, but they are different from the normal bacteria that biologists often study. In fact, the differences between regular bacteria and archaebacteria are so great that they are classified apart from other forms of life and have challenged the way scientists classify life into different kingdoms. Though archaebacteria and a regular bacteria were once considered part of the same kingdom, molecular biology and genetics have shown that these prokaryotic organisms have many unique features...

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How Many Amino Acids Are In The Body: Essential And Non-Essential

Amino acids are compounds which contain the functional groups amine and carboxyl, and are composed of the elements hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon primarily, though some other elements find their way in. Eukaryotic organisms have 21 essential amino acids found within their cells, and this includes in the human body. Let's go over the different types of amino acids, including the 21 essential amino acids and some nonessential amino acids. The Structure Of Amino Acids Chemical...

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Cellular Respiration Formula

Cellular respiration formula is the collective term for a number of different processes which convert biochemical energy derived from nutrients into a molecule called adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the form of usable chemical energy needed to drive cellular processes. This process takes in six molecules of oxygen and it produces water and carbon dioxide in addition to adenosine triphosphate or ATP. This process can be represented by the following chemical formula: C6H12O6 + 6O2 --> 6CO2 + 6H2O + 36 or...

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Knee Anatomy: Bones And Muscles

The knee is responsible for joining together the leg and the thigh. Like the shoulder, the knee is a joint. The knee is a huge joint that lets the leg and thigh extend and flex, though it is actually made of two different joints, the tibiofemoral joint and the patellofemoral joint. The tibiofemoral joint is located in between the tibia and femur while the patellofemoral joint is located in between the patella and the femur. The femur, patella, and tibia...

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Nucleotide Structure: DNA Diagram

Nucleotides are chemical compounds that form the basic structure of nucleic acids like RNA and DNA. The chemical structure of nucleotides is almost the same regardless of whether or not the nucleotide is an RNA or DNA nucleotide. Nucleotides are made out of elements like nitrogen and carbon with a nitrogenous base, a five-carbon sugar component, and a group of phosphates. However, there are some important differences between RNA nucleotides and DNA nucleotides. The nitrogenous bases come in one of...

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What Elements Are In Lipids?

Lipids are macromolecules, large organic molecules, that carry out many different functions needed for life. Lipids function to store energy, compose the membrane of cells, and act as chemical signalers. In terms of the elements found in lipids, all lipids contain oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon. Some lipids also contain phosphorus and nitrogen. The elements that a lipid is made out of depends upon the type of lipid and the role it carries out. Let's examine some of the different types...

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Small Intestine Function: Duodenum, Jejunum And Ileum

Though it is called the small intestine, it is somewhat ironically the longest portion of the gastrointestinal tract. As part of the digestive system, the small intestine works alongside the other organs in the digestive system to digest food, absorbing nutrients from food after it has left the stomach. The small intestine turns the food one eats into energy. There are three distinct portions of the small intestine: the ileum, the jejunum and the duodenum. Let’s examine the small intestine in...

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Is CCl4 (Carbon Tetrachloride) Polar Or Nonpolar?

Carbon Tetrachloride can be expressed as CCl4, and it is made out of one carbon molecule and four chloride molecules. Carbon tetrachloride is nonpolar. Why is carbon tetrachloride nonpolar? It is nonpolar because the dipole moments of the molecule are evenly spaced around the central carbon atom. This means that their individual effects are canceled out, and the molecule is neutral. The four chlorine atoms are positioned symmetrically at the four corners of a tetrahedron, and a single bond joins...

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Shoulder Ligaments, Bones And Tendons

The human shoulder is a complex structure that must be stable enough to support the actions of the arm and hands like pulling, lifting, and pushing object. At the same time, it must be mobile enough for these actions to occur. What tendons, joints, muscles, and bones make up the human shoulder? The shoulder isn't just one bone, it's actually made up of three different bones and various tendons, ligaments, and muscles. The three bones located in the shoulder are...

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