Periodic Table Ionic Charges, Name, And Mass

The periodic table ionic charge can be broken down by metals which are positive and on the left of the table and nonmetals which are negative and found on the right. The periodic table can also be broken down by name and mass depending on your interests.

There can be no doubt that any science student who is interested in chemistry must learn the periodic table. But just learning the periodic table is not really enough. It is a merely first step before going deeper into it. The next step would be to add the ionic charges, the full names, and mass of each of the elements.

In other words, we start off by learning the periodic table but then we must also learn all the other relevant details about each and every one of the elements.

What Is The Periodic Table?    

The modern periodic table is the result of hundreds of years’ worth of research. The first known attempt at organizing all chemical elements into a tabular arrangement dates back to 1789 when French chemist Antoine Lavoisier.

That first version contained 33 elements, which Lavoisier had grouped into the following categories:

  • Gases.
  • Metals.
  • Nonmetals.
  • Earths.

After undergoing many changes through the 19th century, it was not until 1869 than a Russian chemist called Dmitri Mendeleev came up with his own table in 1869. In his version of the periodic table (known as the Mendeleev periodic table), the elements are organized by mass number, in increasing order.

Elements which are similar as regards their chemical properties have atomic weights which are either of nearly the same value (eg. Pt, Ir, Os) or which increase regularly (eg. K, Ru, Cs). – Dmitri Mendeleev

The current version of the periodic table contains 118 different chemical elements. Each of these elements has a symbol and an atomic number. These symbols and numbers work as shortcuts to identify them.

The main difference between the current periodic table has one major difference with the Mendeleev periodic table is that now the elements are no longer organized by mass number. Instead, the elements are arranged by their atomic numbers.

Elements Broken Down By Ionic Charges

Ionic charges, which is sometimes merely known as “charges” are the difference between the number of electrons and the number of protons. Electrons are particles with a negative charge, while protons are particles with a positive charge.

1. If you look at the periodic table, you will find all the elements with a positive ionic charge (those where protons outnumbered electrons) in the left area.

2. Then, you will find the non-metals (those elements where electrons outnumbered protons) in the right area. There is one exception to this, which is Hydrogen (symbol: H, number 1). The reason for this is that hydrogen, under normal pressures and temperatures, actually behaves like a nonmetal.

3. Finally, you will find the metalloids (or semimetal), which are a mixture of metals and non-metals in the row that, logically, separates metals and non-metals.

Elements Broken Down By Name

If we ordered the element in alphabetical order, we would get the following result:

Element NameElement SymbolAtomic NumberElement NameElement SymbolAtomic Number
ActiniumAc89MercuryHg80
AluminumAl13MolybdenumMo42
AmericiumAm95MoscoviumMc115
AntimonySb51NeodymiumNd60
ArgonAr18NeonNe10
ArsenicAs33NeptuniumNp93
AstatineAt85NickelNi28
BariumBa56NihoniumNh113
BerkeliumBk97NiobiumNb41
BerylliumBe4NitrogenN7
BismuthBi83NobeliumNo102
BohriumBh107OganessonOg118
BoronB5OsmiumOs76
BromineBr35OxygenO8
CadmiumCd48PalladiumPd46
CalciumCa20PhosphorusP15
CaliforniumCf98PlatinumPt78
CarbonC6PlutoniumPu94
CeriumCe58PoloniumPo84
CesiumCs55PotassiumK19
ChlorineCl17PraseodymiumPr59
ChromiumCr24PromethiumPm61
CobaltCo27ProtactiniumPa91
CoperniciumCn112RadiumRa88
CopperCu29RadonRn86
CuriumCm96RheniumRe75
DarmstadtiumDs110RhodiumRh45
DubniumDb105RoentgeniumRg111
DysprosiumDy66RudidiumRb37
EinsteiniumEs99RutheniumRu44
ErbiumEr68RutherfordiumRf104
EuropiumEu63SamariumSm62
FermiumFm100ScandiumSc21
FleroviumFl114SeaborgiumSg106
FluorineF9SeleniumSe34
FranciumFr87SiliconSi14
GadoliniumGd64SilverAg47
GalliumGa31SodiumNa11
GermaniumGe32StrontiumSr38
GoldAu79SulfurS16
HafniumHf72TantalumTa73
HassiumHs108TechnetiumTc43
HeliumHe2TelluriumTe52
HolmiumHo67TennessineTs117
HydrogenH1TerbiumTb65
IndiumIn49ThalliumTl81
IodineI53ThoriumTh90
IridiumIr77ThuliumTm69
IronFe26TinSn50
KryptonKr36TitaniumTi22
LanthanumLa57TungstenW74
LawrenciumLr103UraniumU92
LeadPb82VanadiumV23
LithiumLi3XenonXe54
LivermoriumLv116YtterbiumYb70
LutetiumLu71YttriumY39
MagnesiumMg12ZincZn30
ManganeseMn25ZirconiumZr40
MeitneriumMt109

Elements Broken Down By Mass

Finally, if we looked at the atomic mass of each of the elements we will notice that there are huge differences between them.

Here is the list of 118 chemical elements in the order they are presented in the periodic table in which we also include their atomic mass:

Element NameElement SymbolAtomic NumberAtomic Mass
HydrogenH11.0079
HeliumHe24.0026
LithiumLi36.941
BerylliumBe49.0122
BoronB510.811
CarbonC612.0107
NitrogenN714.0067
OxygenO815.9994
FluorineF918.9984
NeonNe1020.1797
SodiumNa1122.9897
MagnesiumMg1224.305
AluminumAl1326.9815
SiliconSi1428.0855
PhosphorusP1530.9738
SulfurS1632.065
ChlorineCl1735.453
PotassiumK1939.0983
ArgonAr1839.948
CalciumCa2040.078
ScandiumSc2144.9559
TitaniumTi2247.867
VanadiumV2350.9415
ChromiumCr2451.9961
ManganeseMn2554.938
IronFe2655.845
NickelNi2858.6934
CobaltCo2758.9332
CopperCu2963.546
ZincZn3065.39
GalliumGa3169.723
GermaniumGe3272.64
ArsenicAs3374.9216
SeleniumSe3478.96
BromineBr3579.904
KryptonKr3683.8
RubidiumRb3785.4678
StrontiumSr3887.62
YttriumY3988.9059
ZirconiumZr4091.224
NiobiumNb4192.9064
MolybdenumMo4295.94
TechnetiumTc4398
RutherniumRu44101.07
RhodiumRh45102.9055
PalladiumPd46106.42
SilverAg47107.8682
CadmiumCd48112.818
IndiumIn49114.818
TinSn50118.71
AntimonySb51121.76
IodineI53126.9045
TelluriumTe52127.6
XenonXe54131.293
CesiumCs55132.9055
BariumBa56137.327
LanthanumLa57138.9055
CeriumCe58140.116
PraseodymiumPr59140.9077
NeodymiumNd60144.24
PromethiumPm61145
SamariumSm62150.36
EuropiumEu63151.964
GadoliniumGd64157.25
TerbiumTb65158.9253
DysprosiumDy66162.5
HolmiumHo67164.9303
ErbiumEr68167.259
ThuliumTm69168.9342
YtterbiumYb70173.04
LutetiumLu71174.967
HafniumHf72178.49
TantalumTa73180.9479
TungstenW74183.84
RheniumRe75186.207
OsmiumOs76190.23
IridiumIr77192.217
PlatinumPt78195.078
GoldAu79196.9665
MercuryHg80200.59
ThalliumTl81204.3833
LeadPb82207.2
BismuthBi83208.9804
PoloniumPo84209
AstatineAt85210
RadonRn86222
FranciumFr87223
RadiumRa88226
ActiniumAc89227
ProtactiniumPa91231.0359
ThoriumTh90232.0391
NeptuniumNp93237
UraniumU92238.0289
AmericiumAm95243
PlutoniumPu94244
CuriumCm96247
BerkeliumBk97247
CaliforniumCf98251
EinsteiniumEs99252
FermiumFm100257
MendeleviumMd101258
NobeliumNo102259
RutherfordiumRf104261
LawrenciumLr103262
DubniumDb105262
BohriumBh107264
SeaborgiumSg106266
MeitneriumMt109268
RoentgeniumRg111272
HassiumHs108277
DarmstadtiumDs110N/A
CoperniciumCn112N/A
NihoniumNh113N/A
FleroviumFl114N/A
MoscoviumMc115N/A
LivermoriumLv116N/A
TennessineTs117N/A
OganessonOg118N/A
Hopefully, this helps you study the Periodic Table and gives you a straight answer to the ionic charge, name, and mass of each element in the table.
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