Geoscience Department Feature: University Of Texas At El Paso (UTEP)
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Trevor Nace is the founder of Science Trends. He holds a PhD in geology from Duke University and writes regularly for Forbes on geology, earth science, and natural disasters.

                       

Geoscience Department Feature: University Of Texas At El Paso (UTEP)

Just over 100 years old, the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) is a burgeoning national and international research university committed to access and excellence. A leader among minority-serving institutions, UTEP enrolls over 25,000 students with a large bilingual population. UTEP is designated by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as “Community Engaged,” and UTEP faculty have been nationally recognized for their commitment to student success, teaching, research, and scholarship. As a center for intellectual capital, UTEP...

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Octlantis: The Newly Discovered Octopus City

Recently scientists have discovered a bustling community of approximately 15 gloomy octopi, also known as the Common Sydney Octopus, and scientifically identified as Octopus tetricus. The discovery was made in the waters of Jervis Bay, located off the eastern coast of Australia. This is of particular interests because scientists have long believed that the gloomy octopus was an antisocial creature that spent most of its time alone. Let us review what scientists already know about the gloomy octopus. About the...

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Snow Leopards Removed From Endangered List For First Time In 45 Years

It's good, but not great, news for snow leopards. New population assessments of the big cats shake their 45-year-old status as endangered. The number of these majestic creatures is moving in the right direction. Yet, conservationists warn not to become complacent in the movement to protect the species. The Elusive Big Cat Snow leopards are famous for their imposing yet elusive characteristics. Their habitat expands across 12 countries of Central Asia in remote, rugged landscapes. Snow leopards travel ranges up...

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Can Childhood Experiences Alter Your DNA and Make You Prone to Illness?

It has always been thought that our DNA is set in stone from the moment we are conceived and that our risk of suffering from hereditary diseases such as Alzheimer’s, certain cancers, diabetes, and Huntington’s disease depends mostly on the genes that our parents passed to us through their DNA. However, it has been shown through research over the last 30 years that these genes can be altered and affected by your childhood environment. Researchers are now able to accurately...

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My Science Life: Dr. Roger Slatt, Chair Professor Of Petroleum Geology & Geophysics

Welcome to the My Science Life feature of Dr. Roger M. Slatt, Gungoll Chair Professor of Petroleum Geology and Geophysics and Director, Institute of Reservoir Characterization, University of Oklahoma. It's easier to ask forgiveness than it is to get permission. - Grace Hopper Dr. Roger M. Slatt What is your job like on a daily basis? A typical day might be lecturing for 3 hours, preparing lectures, guiding graduate students (I have graduated 101 since being at...

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My Science Life: Vice President Arthur Ellis – University Of California Office Of The President

Welcome to the My Science Life feature of Art Ellis, the vice president for research and graduate studies at the University of California Office of the President (UCOP). I joined the University of California Office of the President (UCOP) as vice president for research and graduate studies in 2016. My research and teaching disciplinary background are chemistry. Since 2002, I have held a series of full-time administrative leadership positions, first at the U.S. National Science Foundation, then at UC San...

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My Science Life: Dr. Bill Sullivan, Showalter Professor Of Pharmacology & Toxicology

Welcome to the My Science Life feature of Dr. Bill Sullivan, Showalter Professor at Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM), where he studies infectious disease. Bill has published over 70 papers in scientific journals and written for Scientific American, Scientific American MIND, Salon.com, GotScience.org, What Is Epigenetics, and more. He is writer and editor at PLOS Sci Comm and maintains his own popular science blog called THE ‘SCOPE. Bill received his Ph.D. in Molecular & Cell Biology from the University...

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Water Balance Equation: Case Study From Lake Erie

Lake Erie is a vital resource to both the United States and Canada.  It is the fourth largest of the Great Lakes and thirteenth in the world by surface area (25,655 km2) with a volume of 484 km3 and an average residence time of 2.6 years.  The lake provides a potable water source for many cities including Buffalo, NY and Cleveland, OH; as well as a source of commercial fishing, industrial ports, leisure, transportation and agricultural irrigation. The United States...

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My Science Life: Assistant Professor John W. Jamieson, Canada Research Chair In Marine Geology

Welcome to the My Science Life feature of Dr. John W. Jamieson, Assistant Professor and Canada Research Chair in Marine Geology at Memorial University of Newfoundland. I am an Economic Geologist that specializes in marine mineral resources and seafloor hydrothermal systems. I grew up in Edmonton, Alberta. B.Sc. (Honours Geology) – University of Alberta M.Sc. (Geology) – University of Maryland Ph.D. (Geology) – University of Ottawa Prior to starting my position at Memorial University (in 2016), I was a research scientist...

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My Science Life: Planetary Geologist Dr. Paul Byrne

Welcome to the My Science Life feature of Dr. Paul Byrne, assistant professor in the Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University. I am a planetary geologist, and my primary areas of expertise lie in using spacecraft and field data to understand tectonic and volcanic processes on Earth and other planets. Originally from Ireland, I moved to the United States in 2011 for a postdoctoral fellowship with NASA’s MESSENGER mission to Mercury. Based at the Carnegie...

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