The Deep History Of The Caucasus Is Beginning To Be Revealed Through Genetic Sequencing
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About The Author

I am a Professor in the Department of Anthropology, and a Consulting Curator in the Physical Anthropology and American Sections of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and Anthropology. I am also the Director of the North American Regional Center of the Genographic Project, and Head of the Laboratory of Molecular Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania.

For the past thirty years, I have investigated the genetic prehistory of Asia and the Americas through studies of mtDNA, Y-chromosome and autosomal DNA variationin Asian, Siberian and Native American populations. Our current projects include studies of genetic diversity in indigenous populations of Canada, the United States, Mexico and the Caribbean. My research group is also investigating the population history of Georgia (Caucasus), Pakistan and Kazakhstan through our collaborative genetic studies in those countries.

                       

The Deep History Of The Caucasus Is Beginning To Be Revealed Through Genetic Sequencing

Svaneti, a rugged highland region of northwestern Georgia, lies along one of the few ancient transit routes between the South and North Caucasus and thus links the worlds of the Middle East and the steppe of Eastern Europe. It is also home to speakers of a language not closely related to any other. Svan and Georgian, its southern neighbor, both belong to the Kartvelian family of languages, although one is not mutually intelligible with the other. Although Svans are mentioned...

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