The Amygdala And Observational Learning
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About The Author

Dr. Stephen Allsop is a neuroscientist who trained as a graduate student and postdoc in the Tye lab at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and has been conducting biomedical research for over 10 years. While at MIT, he studied how social information is processed and integrated in the brain. His research is guided by the belief that deconstructing these mechanisms will provide a better understanding of how social groups function and offer more insight into the implications this has for the development and function of society at large. Within the scientific community, Dr. Allsop leads efforts to increase scientists’ awareness of social biases and exposure to tools that help increase cultural and intellectual diversity and inclusion. He leverages his background in social neuroscience to creatively address the current socio-political challenges confronting American society, as he believes that an interdisciplinary application of social neuroscience, psychology, and sociology can provide solutions to these problems. Dr. Allsop received his Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his B.S. in Biology, summa cum laude, from North Carolina Central University. He is completing a medical degree at Harvard Medical School.

                       

The Amygdala And Observational Learning

Survival in the world requires the ability to respond appropriately to the things that happen in our environment. We have to be able to go after the things that are rewarding such as food, shelter, or a mate, while avoiding dangerous things like predators or poisons. All animals have some mechanism that allows them to seek the good and avoid the bad, all with the aim of increasing their ability to survive and pass their genes on to their offspring....

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