Yo-Yo Diets Don’t Work
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About The Author

Dr. Simonds’ research aims to expand our understanding of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in order to expedite the development of sensitive diagnostic tools and specific pharmaceutical agents. Stephanie takes research from the basic level examining the physiology of disease development, through to discovering targets to treat diseases in human.

Dr. Simonds is competent in multiple world-leading physiological research techniques, techniques so technically difficult only a handful of people worldwide perform them.  Dr. Simonds routinely uses cutting-edge techniques in combination to better understand the origins of disease and disease progression. Work performed by Dr. Simonds is at the forefront of what is possible in biomedical research. The quality and impact of this work is reflected in the number and impact of original research publications. Dr. Simonds work has been published in top-tier journals including Nature, Cell, Cell metabolism and The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Dr. Simonds has been acknowledged for her bold and innovative research with numerous prestigious awards including L’Oréal UNESCO for women in science Australia fellowship (2017), The Victorian government Premiers Award for Health and Medical research (2016), The National Heart Foundation of Australia Paul Korner Innovation Award (2015) and The Royal Society of Victoria young scientist of the year research award (2012). Dr. Simonds has been an active member of the Victorian Government Science, Medical Research and Technology (SMaRT) ministerial advisory panel.

                       

Yo-Yo Diets Don’t Work

Published by Jack Pryor and Stephanie Simonds Department of Physiology, Monash Biomedical Discovery Institute, Monash University, Australia These findings are described in the article entitled Repeated weight cycling in obese mice causes increased appetite and glucose intolerance, recently published in the journal Physiology & Behavior (Physiology & Behavior 194 (2018) 184-190). This work was conducted by Stephanie E. Simonds, Jack T. Pryor, and Michael A. Cowley from Monash University. A new year; a new you: If this year new actually means thinner then perhaps you’ve made...

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