About The Author

Robert Carter is Professor of Arabian and Middle Eastern Archaeology, and Graduate Tutor (Taught). He coordinates the Archaeology of the Arab and Islamic World MA, and lectures on the archaeology of the region from the Palaeolithic era to the coming of Islam. His main research concerns the origins of the Gulf towns, and his chief research project is the Origins of Doha and Qatar, a multidisciplinary project that combines archaeology, historical research, GIS and oral histories to explore the development of Doha. His second major research project, the Shahrizor Prehistory Project, examines settlement and complexity in northern Iraq in the 5th-6th millennia BC (Ubaid Period). Professor's Carter's other research includes Neolithic seafaring in the Gulf (5th-6th millennia BC); the formative role played by the pearl fishery in the shaping of the Gulf countries; and medieval urbanism and maritime trade in the Gulf.

Prof Carter holds a PhD in Bronze Age Eastern Arabia and an MA from the UCL Institute of Archaeology, London. Since 1993 he has conducted fieldwork, artefact studies and consultancy in many parts of the Gulf, including Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, Sharjah, Ras al-Khaimah, Fujairah, as well as in Iran.

Too Much Water May Have Been A Problem For Ancient Iraq

Today, Iraq is suffering from prolonged droughts and drops in water levels in its well-known rivers: the Tigris and Euphrates. For scholars, ancient Iraq is known as the place of some of the earliest cities and what ultimately became organized governments that we would find familiar. While this is true, before even the rise of