How Hand Grip Strength Could Indicate Brain Health
Share This:
                           

About The Author

Richard G. Carson is Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience of Ageing at Trinity College Dublin; Chair in Psychology at Queen’s University Belfast; and Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland.

His research concerns human brain plasticity, with a focus upon changes that occur across the lifespan. It is geared towards the development of methods to maintain and restore cognitive and movement function in later life. Much of his current clinical and pre-clinical research has a specific emphasis upon the rehabilitation of upper limb function in stroke survivors, including the development and therapeutic evaluation of assistive devices. A particular interest is the neural basis of individual differences in the preservation of cognitive and motor function in older people.

                       

How Hand Grip Strength Could Indicate Brain Health

One of the most remarkable findings to emerge from medical science in recent years is the strong association that exists between age-related declines in hand grip strength and a host of other indices of health and well-being. In recognition of its power to predict health outcomes that only become evident several decades later, Richard Bohannon has described maximum grip strength as a “vital sign” for middle-aged and older adults. It is perhaps natural to assume that a diminution in grip...

Read more