Observing How Latrodectus Spiders Protect Their Eggs
Share This:
                           

About The Author

My research focuses on understanding the role of developmental experience in shaping individual behavior, population-level patterns of behavioral variation, and their association with other traits. My goal is to link this variation that arises from developmental processes to a range of ecological and evolutionary processes that may maintain this variation, from life history tradeoffs, to sexual selection, to predator-prey interactions and prey community dynamics. I study these questions using a variety of terrestrial invertebrate systems, with a primary focus on field crickets and black widow spiders.

                       

Observing How Latrodectus Spiders Protect Their Eggs

The act of producing offspring is one of the most energetically costly things an animal has to do in its life. For example, in black widow spiders, a single egg case can weigh over 1/3 of the female’s body mass. Thus, it makes sense that the parent(s) should actively defend their reproductive investment from the multitude of other animals that may want to eat, steal, or parasitize their offspring. Yet, not all offspring are equally valuable for several reasons. Parent(s)...

Read more