Targeting PARP1 Activity May Be An Effective Treatment For Some Epstein-Barr Patients
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About The Author

Michael Hulse is a PhD Student at Temple University. Michael graduated from the University of Edinburgh in 2012 with an MSc in Biomedical Sciences. Following this, he spent two years working for AstraZeneca in their oncology department analyzing pharmacodynamic endpoints as part of drug discovery research projects. He subsequently spent a year at MedImmune working in Analytical Development to introduce and validate assays for Influenza vaccine quality control. He is now in Dr. Tempera’s lab where he has been focused on understanding the mechanisms by which Epstein-Barr Virus Latent Membrane Protein 1 modifies host gene expression.

                       

Targeting PARP1 Activity May Be An Effective Treatment For Some Epstein-Barr Patients

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the herpes virus family and is one of the most common human viruses. Up to 95% of people will get infected with EBV at some point in their lives, with the virus spreading most commonly through bodily fluids, primarily saliva. After a person is infected with EBV, the virus becomes latent (inactive) and persists for the rest of that individual’s life in the B cells of their immune system. In some cases,...

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