Breast Cancer Advances: Understanding Axillary Lymphadenectomy
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About The Author

Mehran Habibi, M.D. is the medical director of the Johns Hopkins Breast Center on the Bayview campus and co-director of the Second Opinion Cancer Surgery Program. He specializes in breast surgical oncology, with an emphasis on compassionate patient care and personalized surgical treatment for breast cancer patients. Dr. Habibi was fellowship trained in breast surgical oncology. His expertise includes complex breast cancer cases including male breast cancer, sarcoma, rare tumors and breast cancer in pregnancy and young patients.

Dr. Habibi received his medical degree in Tehran and his MBA at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, VA. He completed his internship at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, his surgical residency at St. Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem, PA, and a fellowship in breast surgical oncology at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. He joined the Johns Hopkins faculty as assistant professor of surgery in 2007. His research involves new surgical techniques and adjuvant therapies for fighting breast cancer, better detection and identification of cancers, and outcomes research dealing with caregiving and survivorship. Dr. Habibi's work has been published in several medical journals, including American Journal of Oncology Review and The American Surgeon.

                       

Breast Cancer Advances: Understanding Axillary Lymphadenectomy

According to a 2016 publication, breast cancer will affect up to 12% of women in the United States at some point in their lifetime (1). The first description of this disease and its rudimentary presentation dates back to the Edwin Smith Papyrus, an ancient Egyptian surgical text, around 3000 BC (2). These early breast cancer diagnoses meant certain death, as no practical treatment was available for long-term survival. It was not until the late 1800s that outcomes began to substantially...

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