How Tropical Dry Forests Respond To Hurricane Damage
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About The Author

Mariana Yólotl Álvarez Añorve is a Biologist and PhD in Sciences from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. He completed a post-doctorate at the University of Minnesota in the Department of Ecology and Evolution in the United States. Her research focuses on the area of ​​tropical ecology, on the study of the response of plants to environmental variations, stress and human disturbance. She is involved, together with collaborators from the University of Alberta (Canada), in the development of novel techniques for the functional study of vegetation, such as the use of remote sensors to characterize the functional status of the arboreal communities in tropical landscapes.

                       

How Tropical Dry Forests Respond To Hurricane Damage

Global climate change is considered an emerging threat to the persistence and functioning of dry tropical ecosystems, which are the most threatened of all tropical forest ecosystems worldwide. In the tropical dry forest (TDF) of the Pacific Coast of Mexico, in particular, the average cyclone intensity and the number of very intense category 4 and 5 storms are predicted to increase. Indeed, over a four-year period, hurricanes have landed twice in the Pacific Coast of Mexico, directly impacting the TDF...

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