Using Open Door/Windows To Ventilate Bedrooms And The Consequent Effect On Sleep Quality
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About The Author

Marcel Loomans is assistant professor in the group Building Performance in the Department of the Built Environment, Eindhoven university of Technology (TU/e). His areas of expertise include building technology, environmental studies, indoor environment, building physics, computational fluid dynamics, sustainable energy and performance based building. His research interests focus on the performance of the indoor environment (mainly thermal and air quality), as well in the design as in-use phase. As it is very much multidisciplinary, this topic needs close collaboration. It touches on several fields of expertise. Indoor environmental quality in health care environments (from the operating theatre to patient rooms) has been investigated, as have the sleeping environment in dwellings and spatial and temporal transients that users undergo when using buildings in real-life, to name bust a a few examples. Real-life in-situ assessment, combining physical sensors and the human sensor (perception and/or physiological) is another area of attention.

                       

Using Open Door/Windows To Ventilate Bedrooms And The Consequent Effect On Sleep Quality

Bedrooms are an important part of our homes, considering we spend around one-third of our life sleeping. Further, our sleep quality also influences our performance during the remainder of the day and overall health. Sleep quality is affected by many parameters. The indoor environment, more specifically the indoor air quality (IAQ), is such a parameter that has started receiving attention only recently. You may have noticed the dust-laden sun rays streaming into the room on a chilly and sunny winter...

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