Fossil Beetles From Cretaceous Amber Show New Insights Into Early Plant-Insect Relationships
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About The Author

Katarzyna Walaczynska is a Ph.D. student at the University of Gdansk in the Institute of Oceanography. Their areas of research expertise include biodiversity, ecology and evolution, molecular ecology, and conservation biology.

                       

Fossil Beetles From Cretaceous Amber Show New Insights Into Early Plant-Insect Relationships

Coleoptera, commonly known as “beetles,” with about 400,000 species, is the largest order in nature, constituting almost 40% of described insects and 25% of all known animal life-forms. The extraordinary species richness probably resulted by their elevated survival of lineages and their sustained diversification in a variety of niches (Hunt et al., 2007). Beetles are currently among the most important pollinators of flowering plants, especially basal angiosperms, represented by particular species of four groups: Scarabaeoidea, Tenebrionoidea, Curculionoidea, Chrysomeloidea (Wang et...

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