The Hard Life Of Female Offspring When Sharing Maternal Care With A Brother
Share This:
                           

About The Author

I work in the Department of Evolutionary Ecology at the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC (National Museum of Natural Sciences, Spanish Council for Scientific Research). My research fields are behavioural ecology and conservation biology, and my current interests are the behavioural and ecological adaptations of strong sexual selection, the evolution of sex ratio and sexual segregation in species with extreme sexual size dimorphism, and the effects of human-induced landscape changes on the behaviour and population dynamics of wild species.

Working mostly with birds, my research has been typically based on long-term monitoring of behavioural patterns and life histories of marked individuals. By linking individual behaviour with population ecology, my aim was to find answers to fundamental questions in behavioural ecology through a deep knowledge of the species and systems studied, that could also later be applied to their conservation.

                       

The Hard Life Of Female Offspring When Sharing Maternal Care With A Brother

In many polygynous species, males do not participate in brood care duties. Offspring frequently have long maternal dependence periods during which they receive protection and food from their mother. When a mother has more than one offspring and food is scarce, she has to decide whether to try to raise the whole brood or ensure the survival of at least part of her progeny. The problem is complicated when the sex of these offspring comes into play. Since these species...

Read more