The Hand Of Mountain Gorillas Is As Well Adapted To Vertical Climbing Behaviors As The Hand Of Chimpanzees
Share This:
                           

About The Author

I am a biological anthropologist interested in understanding how African apes interact with their physical environment. I approach this through an integrative and comparative morphological, biomechanical and behavioural analysis. Currently, I am a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Birmingham developing an 'Enclosure Design Tool' (EDT) to help sanctuaries promote wild-type behaviours in chimpanzees that are missing or underrepresented. This project is conducted in partnership with Ape Action Africa, Cameroon.

                       

The Hand Of Mountain Gorillas Is As Well Adapted To Vertical Climbing Behaviors As The Hand Of Chimpanzees

Grasping is a hallmark adaptation among primate hands. All primates need to climb in search of fruits in the upper forest canopy. Prehensile grasping is an important prerequisite for climbing because it provides stability in any position of the three-dimensional environment that primates inhabit. Although there are some records about the frequency of vertical climbing behavior in wild great apes, the time spent on vertical climbing varies depending on the species and population studied. This is particularly apparent in mountain...

Read more