Injection Of Nanofiber “Peanuts” For Hemostasis
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About The Author

Dr. Xie is an Assistant Professor at the Mary & Dick Holland Regenerative Medicine Program and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nebraska Medical Center.

Xie laboratory’s research interests center on the synthesis, surface modification, self-assembly of materials at nanometer scale to address problems in the field of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and drug/gene delivery. Our research programs are built upon interdisciplinary subjects including materials science, engineering, biology and medicine. We develop novel, smart biomaterials with well-controlled composition, structure and functional properties. We employ analytical tools in materials science, biology and medicine to characterize these biomaterials as either scaffolds or drug/gene carriers. Specifically, we are interested in use of nano-structured materials together with signaling molecules to regulate cell/stem cell behaviors for regenerating various types of tissues including tendon-to-bone insertion site, cartilage, bone, skin, cardiac muscle, and nerve. We are also interested in developing nano-structured materials for enhancing survival, proliferation, and function of human islets in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we are interested in developing nanofibrous materials as local drug delivery devices for prevention of surgical site infection.

                       

Injection Of Nanofiber “Peanuts” For Hemostasis

Noncompressible torso hemorrhage (NCTH) is a significant cause of mortality in both civilian and military settings. NCTH is a high-grade injury present in the pulmonary, solid abdominal organ, major vascular, or pelvic trauma domains, or a combination. Rapid operative management, as part of a damage control resuscitation strategy, remains the mainstay of treatment of NCTH. Of the 1.8 million patients in the 2007-2009 National Trauma Data Bank, 249,505 met the anatomic criteria for noncompressible torso injury. Of these patients, 20,414...

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