Ji-Guang Zhang

Dr. Zhang is a Laboratory Fellow in the Energy Processes & Materials Division at PNNL. He is the PI on PNNL's efforts on Energy Storage for Transportation supported by the DOE/EERE/OVT office and PNNL's Transformation Materials Science Initiative. He has 24 years of experience in the development of energy storage devices, including lithium-ion batteries; thin-film, solid-state batteries; Li-S batteries; lithium-air batteries, and electrochromic devices.

Prior to joining PNNL in June 2007, he served for seven years as Chief Technology Officer of Excellatron Solid State LLC in Atlanta, Georgia. His responsibilities at Excellatron included strategic planning, identification of R&D direction, review of all internal programs, funding allocation for internal programs, and oversight of all subcontractor programs. He was also responsible for day-to-day performance of the technical team for development of thin-film lithium batteries and other energy related products. From 1998 to 2000, he served as the Director of Product Development at Macro Energy-Tech, Inc. in Redondo Beach, California, where he was responsible for setting up a pilot line for production of polymer lithium-ion batteries. Prior to that, from 1990 to 1998, he was a Postdoctoral Fellow/Staff Scientist/Senior Scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory where he managed several lithium-ion-battery related projects.

Dr. Zhang holds 23 patents (with another 17 patents pending) and has more than 250 papers published in professional journals.

Dr. Zhang's research interests are energy storage materials and devices to include lithium batteries, lithium ion batteries and Li-S batteries; energy saving materials and devices to include electrochromics materials and devices and thermochromic materials and devices; solid state electrolyte and solid state batteries to include thin film batteries and solid state Li-S batteries.

A New Approach For High Energy Density Li-Ion Batteries

The golden era of electric mobility may be upon us. In 2016, ~160,000 plug-in electric vehicles were sold in the US. To further achieve wide market penetration, the US Department of Energy and the Advanced Battery Consortium proposed that electric […]