Jatropha curcas: A Renewed Promise To Meet Sustainable Future Energy Needs
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About The Author

Originally from the UK and with permanent resident status in Malaysia, Prof. Dr. Jennifer Ann Harikrishna completed her doctoral thesis on the molecular genetics of industrial yeast at the Cranfield Institute of Technology, Cranfield University, U.K. for which she was awarded Chancellors Gold Medal for the most outstanding graduate student of the year in 1990. She followed this with a two year post-doctoral fellowship at the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF) before moving to Malaysia. She held positions at TropBio Research Sdn. Bhd., University Putra Malaysia and the Malaysia University of Science and Technology before returning to work at the University of Malaya in 2006. Prof. Jenni’s current research focus is on the molecular biology, biotechnology and biosafety of moncotolydenous plants including orchid, banana, medicinal ginger, rice and oil palm. Prof. Jenni has a current H-index of 12 (Google) and 10 (WoS (ISI)), has authored over 50 peer-reviewed publications with over 800 citations.

                       

Jatropha curcas: A Renewed Promise To Meet Sustainable Future Energy Needs

Sustainable production of energy and industrial materials from non-food crops can substantially reduce our reliance on non-renewable fossil fuel reserves. Jatropha curcas is a promising non-food crop with oil-rich seeds (30-48%), an easy propagation system, and high adaptability to a wide range of climatic and soil conditions. These attributes have led to the promotion of Jatropha for low-cost biodiesel production and as part of the solution to the challenges of climate change, energy crisis, and provision of rural income. However,...

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