How Do You Rapidly Feed A Hungry Brain?
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About The Author

Jay S. Coggan is a Scientist in Molecular Systems in the Simulation Neuroscience Division.

Jay’s focus is on Computational Modeling of energy consumption in the brain and on scientific writing and editing.

Before moving to Switzerland, Jay held several roles in the US including scientific editor at Neuron, Cell Press; staff researcher at the Salk Institute; project scientist at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD); research associate at Washington University, St. Louis; and he was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University.

During this time, Jay was recognized with the New Investigator Award, Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program, at UCSD; the McDonnell Center for Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience Fellowship Award, at Washington University, St. Louis; National Research Service Award (NIH), at Stanford University; and he received an Eli Lilly & Co. Pre-doctoral Fellowship Award, at University of Arizona, Tucson.

Jay holds a PhD in Pharmacology and Toxicology from the University of Arizona, Tucson and a BA in Psychology, from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

                       

How Do You Rapidly Feed A Hungry Brain?

The remarkable computing capacity of the brain has roots in the structural and functional design features of neurons, glia and the circuits they form. Electrical properties, geometrical details, and biochemical constituents endemic to diverse cell types all contribute to effective biological computations. Energy management equally underlies efficiency; the human brain operates with less wattage than a light bulb, considerably less than any supercomputer. Superficially, it would be easy to say that the primary brain food is glucose, a common sugar....

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