Teaching Astronomy From An Early Childhood Age
Share This:
                           

About The Author

Iharka is a research scientist at the Astronomical Institute of Romanian Academy, Astronomical Observatory Cluj-Napoca.

                       

Teaching Astronomy From An Early Childhood Age

In most cases, the first teachers we have in our lives are our parents. We know that a teacher’s job is finding the way to open a child’s heart and mind. Two beautiful ideas, but seldom does this happens inversely: the child teaches the parents. Our daughter was four years old when she posed a lot of questions about the sky; we tried to translate our astronomical knowledge to her level and we observed that she understood many things. We...

Read more

Predicting The Crash Site For The Tiangong-1

Astronomers have been able to calculate accurately the movement of certain space objects (planets, stars), to tell when and where they will be with high precision. It is interesting that close to the Earth, the exact impact of the Tiangong-1 space station it is hard to calculate. In recent months, astronomers have made calculations, predictions and followed the Tiangong-1 orbit. Let us see how it started: China launched the Shenzhou-1 spacecraft in 1999 and in 2003 the Shenzhou-5 spacecraft aboard...

Read more

Cranial Trepanation On A Woman’s Skull In India: Neolithic Alignments

Interdisciplinary work among anthropologists, archaeologists, and astronomers can provide a very interesting point of view for problems such as the one in this article. The authors investigated a woman’s skeleton with many cranial trepanations from the Neolithic age (around 2000 BC) in Burzahom (North India). The young women (circa 28 years old) had eleven trepanations, nine of which were performed while alive and two post-mortem (Fig. 1). The trepanned skull from Burzahom is a unique situation globally because a skull...

Read more

Rhomboidal And Triangular Four- And Five-body Problems: Planar Central Configurations

Researchers established that many stars are part of multiple-star systems. Moreover, the ratio of multiple-star systems in our galaxy is assumed to be about two-thirds. Looking at stars can lead us into believing that stars are solitary, isolated objects, but in fact, no star is born in isolation. The stellar systems can be modeled applying the gravitational n-body problem. Central Configurations (CC’s) are a very important chapter in the gravitational n-body problems, especially of symmetrically restricted four- and five-body problems....

Read more