The Interpersonal Side Of Intellectual Humility
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About The Author

Harry Reis is a professor of psychology at the University of Rochester. He has been a leading figure in the field of social psychology, credited with helping to launch the study of relationship science and notable for his contribution to theories of intimacy. His research encompasses emotional regulation, the factors that influence social interaction, and consequences of different socializing patterns for health and psychological well-being.

                       

The Interpersonal Side Of Intellectual Humility

Did you smile the first time you heard Garrison Keillor talk about Lake Wobegon, the Minnesota town "where all the women are strong, all the men are good-looking, and all the children are above average?" Social psychologist David Myers seized on Keillor's homespun slogan to provide a catchy name — the Lake Wobegon Effect — for a well-known and robust social-psychological finding: that when it comes to describing ourselves, most of us tend to overestimate our abilities and attributes. Social...

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