About The Author

Dr. Hanli Liu is a senior scientist at the High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research. He received a B.S. in Fluid Mechanics from the University of Science and Technology of China, and a Ph.D. in Atmospheric and Space Physics from the University of Michigan. He came to the Observatory in 1997 as a postdoctoral researcher, and joined the scientific staff in 1999. His research includes: theoretical, numerical, and interpretive studies of the dynamics, structure, and variability of the Earth's middle and upper atmosphere; coupling of different atmospheric regions on global and regional scales, including impacts of lower atmospheric forcing on space weather; atmospheric waves and geophysical turbulence. He is leading the thermosphere/ionosphere extension of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM-X).

Modeling Strong Wind Shears In The Upper Atmosphere

From comfortable breezes to powerful tornados and hurricanes, winds are our most direct experience with the atmosphere. Winds not only blow near the Earth surface but also higher up—like the head/tail winds we see reported when taking an international flight. Actually winds can be much stronger at higher altitudes, for example, winds with speed larger