About The Author

I graduated in Economics at the University of Rome with the idea I wanted to do something useful for people. Maybe the choice of Economics was a mistake and I should have studied physics instead, since I liked it much at the high school. During the BA-MA I attended some courses in Philosophy as I was always interested in what mind and knowledge are. However, I thought philosophy was not enough scientific (at least in Rome), so I later did a Specialisation School (Master) in Neural Networks and Cognitive Psychology at the same University of Rome. Afterwards, I did a PhD in Computer Science at the University of Essex, UK, focussing on artificial intelligence. Before, during, and after the PhD I have been studying a lot of psychology and neuroscience. After the PhD, I came back to Rome, at the CNR-ISTC where I have been ever since, and where I am now a Researcher and Coordinator of the research group LOCEN (Laboratory of Embodied Computational Neuroscience).

Learning In The Brain And Machines

The capacity to adapt and learn with experience is one of the most intriguing features of the brain. The recent dramatic success of artificial intelligence is indeed based on computational models  — deep neural networks — that have a structure and learning mechanisms inspired by the brain’s architecture and plasticity. Interestingly, research on the brain shows that