Comparison Of Dietary Fibre Composition Of Old & Modern Durum Wheat Genotypes
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About The Author

Alison's main focus of research is in the area of wheat quality, exploiting cereal grains for improved human health and processing, specifically the content and composition of dietary fibre. She works within the cell wall team at Rothamsted Research and leads the analytical carbohydrate platform. She has extensive experience in chromatography, mass spectrometry, protein purification, and carbohydrate characterisation. Her area of interest is in the composition, biosynthesis and role of wheat dietary fibre in human health. She is involved in a number of projects related to the role in human health of dietary fibre in wheat and was recently awarded a Newton Fund grant, with collaborators in the Philippines (IRRI and DA-PhilRice), to extend this area of research in rice.

                       

Comparison Of Dietary Fibre Composition Of Old & Modern Durum Wheat Genotypes

As the dominant staple crop in temperate regions of the world, wheat provides between 20% to 50% of the total intake of calories in our diets. Most of the global wheat crop is bread wheat, but durum wheat is grown in regions with a Mediterranean climate and used particularly for making pasta. Modern intensive plant breeding has led to the development of wheat varieties that have higher yields, are shorter in stature, have improved pest resistance, are easier to process...

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