Parents’ Brain Activity “Echoes” Their Infant’s Brain Activity When They Play Together
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About The Author

Dr. Sam Wass gained a first-class undergraduate degree in Experimental Psychology at Oxford University. He spent his twenties working as an opera director, in opera houses in London, Glyndebourne, Berlin, Vienna, Bregenz, Geneva and others, before returning to academia. He did his Ph.D. at the Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development, Birkbeck, and his postdoctoral research in Cambridge, at the Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit. He is currently based at the University of East London, where he is an ESRC Future Research Leader Fellow.

Sam’s research examines how stress affects concentration and learning capacities during childhood. He works with children being raised in low socio-economic status backgrounds, as well as children in early stages of developing conditions such as Autism Spectrum disorders and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. He has received funding from the Medical Research Council, the Economic and Social Research Council, the National Institute of Health Research, the British Academy, the Nuffield Foundation, and others.

                       

Parents’ Brain Activity “Echoes” Their Infant’s Brain Activity When They Play Together

Humans are inherently social. This is particularly important in early development, as young infants spend the majority of their lives interacting with caregivers. However, almost everything that we know about how the brain subserves early attention and learning comes from studies that examined brain function in one individual at a time (largely because it is easier to conduct experiments this way). So, we set out to examine how attention is dynamically shared between a parent and child engaged in social...

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